Only a few short days ago, the stunning American actress Meghan Markle has become the epitome of so many love stories and fantasies – she is now a princess to be. As Prince Harry’s fiancé, she has a reputation to uphold, and with the whole world watching, she is slowly preparing for the big day, which will be in May next year.

If you, as you own future spouse’s princess would like to master some of the art of royal engagement and wedding styles, then read on to discover some of the top guidelines to take home both from Meghan, as well as Prince William’s lovely wife, Kate Middleton – both of these ladies know the royal dress-code and they certainly know how to give it a unique, personal twist!

Classy above all

Photo source: http://www.elle.com/culture/celebrities/a12767360/prince-harry-and-meghan-markle-engagement-announcement/

We all remember Meghan’s skyrocketing success from her famous role with the show Suits, but we can also notice how her own appearance has evolved in the past year, as the moment she became a potential princess has impacted her choice of garments.

Meghan was known for her stylish, yet slightly more revealing outfits, very US and very modern in spirit, from her olive dress she wore to NYFW back in 2013, to the two-piece ensemble for the Upfront Event the year before, she has grown to appreciate a more elevated look.

She has abandoned her love for miniskirts and dresses, and she has started developing her own high-style rich even in classic brands such as Kate’s own favourite British-American Erdem – remember her stunning floral dress she wore to the Caribbean? She now prefers more fine-tailored items with a classy English vibe, although she has remained loyal to her all-American off-duty look for less formal occasions.

Timeless and traditional

Photo by Morgan McDonald on Unsplash

Another unique aspect of royal engagements is that they ought to celebrate history and seamlessly bind their past to the future. And what a better way to achieve this if not with classic diamond engagement rings worthy of royalty, such as the one we’ve seen proudly flaunted by Meghan – the central diamond comes from Botswana, which bears emotional value for both Prince Harry and Meghan, and the surrounding pieces come from Princess Diana’s personal collection.

Just like Kate, who wore Princess Diana’s own ring with a breathtaking sapphire nestled in the embrace of 14 solitaire diamonds, Meghan and Prince Harry have chosen to continue a beautiful family tradition celebrated through invaluable heritage, but also to take royalty into the modern era. There’s nothing quite like inherited engagement rings, but you can always embellish it further with a modern, diamond touch!

The engagement look

Photo by Alice Donovan Rouse on Unsplash

While the Duchess of Cambridge wore a very royal blue wrap dress for her engagement announcement, to match her future husband’s navy suit, Meghan maintained her love for modern minimalism. But both of their outfits reflect their love for tradition as well as their devotion to all things contemporary and chic, so if you’re wondering if you could achieve the same – it’s more than possible! There’s no need to stick to grey or black, and you have plenty of room to find the most flattering form-fitting shape for your look.

Kate has shown a preference for more conservative and sombre style, while Meghan’s acting career has given her plenty of time to find her own look and adapt it to her new royal role without compromising its modern essence. Simple, elegant and authentic is the way to go, as the occasion itself is special enough, it doesn’t require excess glam, in fact, striking the right balance gives the future bride a high level of grace.

For all future brides who wish to recreate a certain royal feel in their own special moments, from engagement to the wedding, remember that it all starts with a princess-like mindset, and a preference for poised, yet modern elegance over flashy or loud choices. After all, you are the princess of the event, and your spouse-to-be is your Prince Charming!

Many thanks to Claire Hastings for this article.

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